Operation Dagger – Experimental Cocktails Gone Right

11 03 2015

Food enthusiasts will be spoilt for choice this month. From 7th to 14th March, we have Singapore Cocktail Week, with a host of activities lined up ranging from cocktail workshops, pop up bars and cocktail bar crawls happening throughout the week.

Then, from 14th to 22nd March comes the 10th edition of Singapore Restaurant Week, where diners get the opportunity to try out special set menus at a special fixed price from some of the finest restaurants in town.

To end off the month, from 26th to 29th March, we have Savour 2015, a food festival for gourmands. Its not merely a gourmet food fair, as attendees also get the chance to participate in interesting workshops such as Sake & Beer Masterclasses and partake in hands-on cooking classes with the guidance of industry professionals. There’s even a Gourmet Market, where you can get your hands on white strawberries, cheeses, oysters, wines, sakes etc. It’s definitely going to be a whole day affair for me.

Given that we are in the midst of Cocktail Week, I thought it would be apt to blog about one of the participating bars – Operation Dagger, where I was at during the first day of the two weekend long event.

Some of my friends had previously raved to me about this joint and after today, I can see why. The spirits used for the cocktails have all undergone some form of modification or redistillation processes to infuse certain flavors into the spirits and are subsequently all rebottled into generic brown bottles, giving the effect of a chemistry lab or fragrance lab. That is also the reason why you won’t ever see spirits in their original bottles here. Very hipster indeed.

I managed to try 2 of the cocktails from the concise menu, both of which I found refreshingly creative. The Egg ($25) comprised of salted egg yolk, vanilla, caramel and had been smoked, which is why it is served in a jar, probably to preserve its smoky aroma. I have come across smoked beers in Bamberg, Germany but never smoked cocktails, so this was a first for me. The cocktail carried with it an incense-like scent that was stronger to the smell than to the taste. I thought that the smokiness accentuated the saltiness of the salted egg yolk, adding greater depth and the cocktail’s flavour sort of reminded me of a mild but smoother Bailey’s.

The tiny glass to the right of The Egg is the Hot + Cold ($25), a cocktail flavoured with lavander, coconut and pineapple. The Hot + Cold literally describes the cocktail, where the top foamy layer is warm and smells like freshly baked buttery new year pastries, while the bottom layer is somewhat reminiscent of a pineapple-infused pina colada. My friend G commented it was too weak for her liking (she’s hardcore and loves stiff drinks) but I actually liked the flavours a lot.

No night is complete with just one cocktail so we headed down to Jigger and Pony for their Punch Bowl and man, it definitely packed a punch despite such an innocent look and unassuming name. I suppose that’s just what happens when 600ml of spirits and a whole bottle of prosecco is poured in a bowl.

Happy drinking!

Operation Dagger

7 Ann Siang Hill, Singapore 069791

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La Maison Fatien – Past its Prime

31 08 2014

When French bistro La Maison Fatien first opened shop over 2 years ago, I remember how hard it was to even secure reservations. The food was great then and the setting dim and intimate, especially on the 2nd floor. So when I found out that Amex Platinum card users could get a 50% discount off ala carte items here (more details below), I jumped at the opportunity, heading down for dinner after work on a Tuesday night.

Dinner started off with a complimentary amuse bouche of what I assumed to be Pork Rillette. Didn’t really enjoy it because the fat tasted somewhat stale and left an unpleasant aftertaste. The Fatien family actually runs a wine merchant business back in Burgundy, France, so we ordered a carafe of their Pinot Noir ($68++), which equates to about 2.5-3 glasses. Sadly, booze is relatively pricey here and is not applicable for the Amex card discount.

Almost identical to the one at Stellar @ 1-Altitude was the homemade Twice-baked Cheese Souffle with Baby Apple, Gruyere Sauce and Mesclun Salad ($27++). Crisp on the outside, puffy on the inside, this was certainly the highlight of our night.

Decided to err on the side of caution and stick to a French staple, the Pan-seared Foie Gras on Brioche served with Gastrique Glazed, Apple Compote, Mesclun Salad and Nuts ($27++). Unfortunately, the foie gras was overcooked and the exterior wasn’t crisp enough either. The apple compote also lacked the tartness required to complement the liver.

The mains failed to impress as the Char-grilled Pork Rack with Lentils, Glazed Vegetables, Onion Fondue and Orange Balsamic Sauce ($36++) lacked character and flavour. The Crispy Skin Duck Confit with homemade Celeriac Mash, Fine Beans and Duck Jus ($33++) fared slightly better but better executions can be easily found elsewhere.

However, I did like our side order of the Truffle Fries ($10++). The cut of the fries was somewhere in between shoe string and chunky, so you really get the best of both worlds, thick enough to get a nice bite but narrow enough to get sufficient crisp on the exterior.

Ended our meal with a pleasant but unmemorable order of Profiteroles with Vanilla Ice Cream and Chocolate Sauce ($24++). The portion was huge and meant for sharing evidently. With more misses than hits, I’m inclined to believe that La Maison Fatien has past its prime. A friend mentioned to me that there has been a reshuffling in their staff recently and this might explain why our recent experience was so different from two years back.

To shed some light on Amex dining promotions, Amex Platinum Card holders are currently offered free memberships to two dining programs, the Classic Far Card Membership and the Palate Program. Under these two programs, card holders get the opportunity to enjoy significant discounts at over 80 restaurants and bars, such as Jaan, Mikuni, Prego, Forlino and il Lido just to name a few. Over and above the above two mentioned programs, card users will also get additional dining benefits under the “Platinum Private Deals”. Of course, terms and conditions apply. More details on the two dining programs are listed below:

palate card
 
Far card

 

In addition, from now till 9 November, 2014, Platinum card members will also get the chance to be one of five lucky winners daily to win $100 worth of Tunglok dining vouchers for the Monday-Saturday draws and $100 worth of Fairmount dining vouchers for the Sunday draws. Each receipt above $50 earns card users 1 chance to win, with doubling of chances for receipts from any The Far Card or Palate establishment.

This meal was sponsored by Amex.





The Flying Squirrel – The Unlikely Chirashi

23 06 2014

He used to be known as Mr Siva, a well-liked PE teacher from Raffles Junior College. Now he is better known as Rai of the singer-songwriting duo Jack and Rai. Multi-talented and adventurous these two are, as they (together with Jack’s wife Angelina) took a leap into local F&B scene early last year by establishing  a modern Japanese restaurant named The Flying Squirrel.

On the menu, conventional Japanese options such as the Chirashi, Sushi and Curry Rice appear next to less traditional options such as the Foie Gras Aglio Olio and Seafood Eggplant Gratin, immediately triggering an alarm in my head. Could such a place really deliver on a decent Chirashi or Sushi?

The answer is a resounding yes. For $25+, the TFS Chirashi was of extremely good value, comprising of slices of Salmon, Tuna, Swordfish, Sweet Shrimp, Scallop, Ikura, Octopus, Tamago and an entire Anago (saltwater eel) over a bed of pearly rice.

Another alternative is the Salmon & Ikura Chirashi ($20+). Again, the eatery is rather generous with the salmon slices and roe.

The Miso Gindara or Grilled Black Cod ($26+) we had was delicious too as it wasn’t too salty and retained some smokiness, though the portion doesn’t fill you up as much as the chirashi.

Given that it was my first day at work in the Tanjong Pagar area today, I returned for a lunch visit. This time, I tried the Summer Chirashi Bento ($25+), only available during lunch time. The main difference between the lunch chirashi and the TFS Chirashi is that the lunch Summer Chirashi Bento uses diced sashimi instead of slices (think along the lines of bara chirashi) and does not include the higher value items of shrimp, scallops or anago to my dismay. However, the bento does make up for it with 3 pieces of fried chicken karaage, salad and fruits. In my humble opinion, ultimately I still derived greater satisfaction from the TFS Chirashi.

As the restaurant is rather small, seating no more than 20 people by my estimates, hence reservations are encouraged.

The Flying Squirrel

92 Amoy Street, #01-02

Tel: +65 6226 2203

Website: http://www.theflyingsquirrel.com.sg/





Stranger’s Reunion – A Lively Cafe

31 08 2013

I first heard of Stranger’s Reunion from ZH last year but never got the chance to drop by (actually I did once without checking opening hours and it happened to be closed). One year down and the once humble cafe has since expanded; now taking up two shop units at its flagship location to cater to the strong demand, as well as opening a second outlet called Strangers’ @ Work at Collyer Quay, with a 3rd outlet in the works.

Stranger’s Reunion wouldn’t be the ideal place if you are looking for a quiet cafe to catch up on reading as the place does get pretty lively, which is exactly what cafe owner cum 3-time National Barista Champion Ryan Tan has been gunning for. The concept of Stranger’s Reunion is predicated upon “old friends catching up”, where cafe goers bump into old acquaintances they haven’t seen in a while.

I was here with some old friends I have known half my life (I’m only 24). We had partied the night before (Zouk’s National Day Mambo) and decided to meet up the next day to grab some coffee and a late breakfast/lunch after sleeping in.

C had the Eggs on Toast ($8++), with choice of eggs cooked either scrambled or poached and choice of English Muffins or Olive Bread or Ciabatta. C opted for the Scrambled eggs on English Muffins. Wouldn’t recommend ordering this as it’s a little plain for my liking and there’s more exciting items available on the menu.

I had the Baked Eggs in Shakshuka with Salami, Goat’s Cheese, Dukkah & Toast ($19.50++), which was rather reminiscent of my favourite brunch item at Cafe Epicurious; Baked Eggs with Toast Soldiers, though the ones here are somewhat less cheesy with stronger hints of tomato in its place. I loved the accompanying bread as it was crisp on the outside yet soft and airy on the inside.

The Truffle Fries with Truffle Aioli & Parmesan Cheese ($12.90++) was very decent as well, hovering around Barracks Cafe and PS Cafe standards, which I find above average relative to others I have tried.

SS had the Buttermilk Waffles with Artisan Greek Yoghurt & Fresh Fruit ($11.50++). There was nothing spectacular about it in my view and on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the crispy-type waffles and 1 being the chewy doughy type, this would lie somewhere around 3-4.

The featured coffee of the day was one from Panama. While the coffee was unique from the usual non-gourmet coffees I’m used to having, I believe what took to me most was the fact that the staff took the time to thoroughly explain where the coffee came from and what was so special about it, even despite the full house. We were given 3 choices of how we would like to have our coffee done and we opted for one cup being made by aeropress and another by syphon (using a vacuum coffee maker, pic shown below). We felt that the syphon method gave a cleaner less bitter taste and both C and myself preferred it over the aeropress.

Overall, I think Stranger’s Reunion is a place worth visiting for their gourmet coffees, light bites, people watching (yes their clientele comprises a young and good looking bunch) and of course, increasing the odds into bumping into old friends.

Stranger’s Reunion

37 Kampong Bahru Road

Tel: +65 6222 4869





Cedele – More than just sandwiches and cakes

24 05 2013

When I think of Cedele, what comes to mind is the relatively healthy sandwiches and the carrot cake but it seems that such is just the tip of the iceberg and applies only to their bakery cafes. There are quite a number of other outlets that do all-day dining (Great World, Wheelock Place, Raffles City) and semi-dining (Rail Mall, Parkway Parade, Serangoon Gardens, Marina Bay Link Mall to be open soon, Greenwich V) as well , where an impressive array of hot mains are available.

The Company’s philosophy of “Eat Well, Be Well” drives Cedele’s operations and is evident with their stand on using organic unrefined sugar, grapeseed oil and ingredients with no trans fat. In addition, much emphasis is also placed on making food with ingredients that are as natural as possible (which I guess is also a healthier option), so no preservatives, emulsifiers or premixes are used in their kitchen.

Running slightly late for this tasting, I had the Apple Cranberry Cinnamon Lassi ($6.70) to cool myself down. Organic yoghurt was used to create the lassi, which was slightly lighter as compared to its Indian counterparts. Didn’t take to the cinnamon though, as it made the drink too powdery such that it didn’t go down my throat smoothly. Moreover, the liberal use of cinnamon musked the apple and cranberry.

Nothing too fancy about the Burmese Shan Tofu ($8.90). It was more or less a simple tau kwa (豆干) dish in Balsamic Dressing garnished with homemade Garlic & Onion Flakes and Fresh Coriander leaves. What I did like though was the garlic and onions, which tasted freshly fried.

For those on a low carb diet, you might want to consider their Grills & Greens Salad Meal: Chicken & Walnut ($15). Different dressing are available such as the Sesame with Plum which coincidentally tastes very much like the plum sauce used for yu sheng (鱼生), the Honey Mustard and the Caesar Dressing. My favourite would be the Caesar. Might be my mind playing tricks on me but their Caesar dressing tasted a lot less unhealthy then what I’m more used to having. Not complaining though, I did eat a KFC Double Down Max with an accompanying piece of Chicken for lunch.

The Vegetable Stacks ($18) was made by stacking a Potato Kumara Cake (a type of Sweet Potato from New Zealand) at the base, followed by a Grilled Eggplant, a Portobello Mushroom and Red Pepper, which is then surrounded by a moat of Tomato Coulis scented with Marjoram. Credits have to go to the Tomato Coulis, as it complemented the vegetables really well and was not overly tart.

Unlike some restaurants which soak their prawns in sugar or salt solutions to give their prawns a nice springy texture, I was given assurance that nothing of the sort was practiced here for the Prawn Paprika Risotto ($17.90), so the fresh crunchy texture I experienced from the prawns was the real deal. To give the risotto a healthy twist, pumpkin and edamame beans were also used as ingredients and it all turned out well.

Finally, something somewhat less healthy for a change, the the Black Pepper Crab Pasta ($17.50)! I like Fried Soft Shell Crabs in general. The one I had here was not as crispy as expected though. That aside, I really loved Pasta, which was scented with Curry Leaves and Pepper. It packs enough heat to make one reminisce the last black pepper crab dinner without being overly choking.

The Lemongrass & Lime Fish Pasta ($17.90) was a nice sequel to the crab pasta. I thought that the lemongrass and lime was titillatingly tangy enough to placate the spice. I’m not a fan of Sea Bass because it tends to get too lean and dry for my liking upon grilling. Apart from the extremely generous size of the fillet, there was nothing extraordinary about the Grilled Sea Bass but it did give off vibes of home-cooked food with the healthy toppings of tomato salsa and edamame beans.

I have to say that desserts were the climax of the meal. I was given a tasting portion of 7 cakes, of which the salted caramel isn’t shown below. My favourite would undoubtedly be the Black Sesame Tahini Cake. It had a very light texture but oh so rich. I literally had a little tingle when I popped the first piece into my mouth. Utterly heavenly.

Other flavours I would recommend as well are the Red VelvetCarrot Walnut Cake and Blueberry Hazelnut Cheesecake while skippable flavours would be the Chocolate Banana Espresso Cake, Strawberry Rose Cake and Salted Caramel (not shown below).

From left, Black Sesame Tahini, Red Velvet, Strawberry Rose Cake, Carrot Walnut Cake, Blueberry Hazelnut Cheesecake, Chocolate Banana Espresso Cake

This meal was sponsored by Cedele. Special thanks for the invitation.

Cedele

1 Kim Seng Promenade, #01-01/02 Great World City

Tel: +65 6836 1426





Latteria Mozzarella Bar – For Cheese Lovers

19 12 2012

Compared to the Chinese, the Italians sure love to complicate things. When ordering bak chor mee (minced meat noodles), we state whether we want mee pok or mee kia, but when an Italian guy orders pasta, he will state whether he wants linguine, spaghetti, tagliatelle, penne or fettuccine and so on. Growing up, I have encountered so many instances where I have felt lost and bewildered staring at the menu of an Italian restaurant, wondering what the words meant.

Pompous as many Singaporeans are, I strutted in confidently to Latteria Mozzarella Bar, smirking that the days of being an “unseasoned” diner was now long behind me. However, a glance at the menu knocked me off my high horse immediately. To think there are over 10 different variants of mozzarella coming in differing shapes, size and density, each with a unique name! Lucky for me, a glossary was provided on the menu to explain each one.

Latteria Mozzarella Bar is a relatively new place just over a year old if I’m not mistaken but the local food scene is evolving so fast  that one can hardly distinguish the definition of new anymore.

Choice of indoor and outdoor seating is available and my party chose the rustic indoor seats given our affinity with air conditioning. Based on observation though, outdoor seats tend to be more popular, especially with the expat crowd, which forms a major clientele for Latteria.

The good thing about Latteria is that food portions are ideal for sharing.

We started off with a Fresh Burrata ($30++). Burrata means “Buttered” in Italian, and is one of my favourite appetizers for Italian meals. It’s made such that a shell of mozzarella encases a rich core of mozzarella and cream. The one here was very decent with a density that was just right, complementing the sweet peppers, cherry tomatoes and rocket leaves well.

The Nodini Pugliesi, Parma Prosciutto ($22++) is also worth trying. Nodini Pugliesi (hiding under the parma ham) are little marshmallow-sized balls of mozzarella that are more dense that Burrata and given the mild-tasting nature of mozzarella, it helps to buffer against the saltiness of parma ham well.

Despite being an Italian joint, I actually found most the meat mains a lot more stellar than the risottos and pastas, the Slow Roasted Lamb Shanks, Chickpeas & Red Wine Casserole ($30++) being such an example. Devoid of gaminess and a fork tender texture sealed the deal. Portions were super generous as we got 2 shanks.

The Linguine Vongole ($25++) was the best pasta dish of our meal. The white wine sauce is a little different here from the usual renditions as some cheese had been added to the white wine base, giving an extra dimension of creamy flavours in addition to the bittersweet flavours of clams.

I would recommend avoiding the Oregano Risotto ($25++), which I think is really yellow due to the use of pumpkin squash. It was really bland, not sweet nor cheesy and if not for the gravy from the lamb shank which I paired the risotto with, it would have been highly unpalatable.

What surprised me most was the Tagliata-style Sirloin ($35++). Done perfectly to medium rare, the quality of the sirloin far exceeded what I had expected given the price range, with visible light marbling and tasty oils oozing with each bite.

The Truffle and Smoked Mozzarella Risotto ($25++) was another let down, as it lacked cheesiness and was bland as well.

When the Porcini and burrata pasta bake ($25++) arrived, my friends jested that it looked like baked pasta from pasta mania. They weren’t that far off though, as the quality of the cheese was probably the main distinguishing factor.

Similar to the Pasta Bake, but way most aesthetically pleasing was the Mac & Cheese ($25++), which was served in a hollowed out pumpkin.

The Tiramisu ($15++) is definitely meant to be shared. In fact, I would go as far as to say that it can easily satisfy dessert cravings for 3-4 pax easily. Taste-wise, it’s rather run of the mill, but with brownie points awarded for the very smooth mascarpone.

As many hits as there were misses, Latteria failed to leave much of an impression apart from the laudable meat dishes.

Latteria Mozzarella Bar

40 Duxton Hill

Tel: +65 6866 1988





The Clan Restaurant – Classy, Lucious & Noteworthy

14 09 2012

Being inconspicuous is the new cool for the dining scene in Singapore, something The Clan Restaurant is trying to emulate but for someone who frequents Bukit Pasoh Road road often enough (for the affordable wines at Magma Restaurant a couple of shops down), The Clan Restaurant sticks out like a sore thumb to me.

There is no shortage of good great food along this stretch, with Oso and Majestic Restaurant just down the road, and Ember, Bistro Soori and Esquina on the adjacent lane. Daring as it might seem in choosing to locate here given the stiff competition, I had little doubt that The Clan Restaurant would be able to pull it off, and fabulously well at that. After all, it is helmed by Executive Chef Ken Teo, formerly of fusion restaurants Dozo and Tao’s Restaurant. Having eaten twice at both these restaurants, I was expectant of a mind blowing meal should The Clan be anything like them.

The Clan Restaurant claims to serve modern European cuisine, though Asian influences are evident within many of their dishes as well. Prices are not cheap per se with 5-Course Set Lunches and 6-Course Set Dinners going for $42.80++ and $62.80++ respectively, but definitely affordable given the quality and quantity of food. Ala carte is available as well, with mains at the $20ish range and all other courses at the $10ish range but I would suggest going for the sets which works out to be way more affordable. You wouldn’t want to miss out on any of the courses anyway.

From the outside, the restaurant doesn’t all look that spacious but once you are in, it feels like a labyrinth. With a seating capacity of 110, I really wonder if the restaurant can handle a full house. There are 2 levels to the restaurant. The 1st boasts an open concept kitchen that allows diners to view the kitchen action whilst enjoying their meals, while the 2nd floor is a little more dim and cosy to cater for more private moments.

1st Floor Seating Area

2nd Floor Seating Area

While waiting for 1 of my friends to arrive, we starting munching on the complimentary bread, which is served with a tasty dip made of sour cream and a hint of truffle oil. With the dips being this good, we weren’t shy to ask for extra helpings.

Before the 1st course, we were served an Apple Sorbet to whet our appetites.

1st Course: Chef’s Starter

Our first course was the Chef’s Starter ($18++), comprising Salmon Mousse Cone, Pan Seared Scallop with Asparagus & Truffle Foam and a Foie Gras Chawanmushi. Apart from the visual appeal, there was nothing fantastic about the powdery salmon mousse as it tasted like it could be bought off the rack from Cold Storage. The Scallop was seared well but I’m not sure if it was prepared some time ago since it didn’t feel as warm as it should be. What I loved most was the Foie Gras Chawanmushi, a smooth steamed egg custard with just enough foie gras blended in to tease the palate.

2nd Course: Cold Dish

The Cold Dish Course is only available for the set dinners, and is the only thing that differentiates the set lunch from the set dinners. C chose the Alaskan King Crab with homemade Karashi Dressing ($20++). The crab was pretty much left unadorned, methinks to allow the natural sweetness of the crab to shine through.

According to the wait staff, one of the more popular cold dishes is the Oyster in 3 Ways ($18++), which I didn’t manage to try since oysters aren’t ideal for sharing.

For myself, I had the Beef Carpaccio, Truffle Mustard Salad, with Truffle Teriyaki and Horseradish Sauce ($16++). I enjoyed the thin slices of marbled raw beef very much, and thought it went well with a light dab of the sweet teriyaki sauce and truffle mustard (which tasted like mayo). Just be sure not to be too liberal with the teriyaki sauce, as The Clan is with its liberal use of Truffle and Foie Gras in naming the dishes on its menu, as it might overwhelm the delicate beefy flavours.

3rd Course: Sides

The Kurobuta Pork Belly Confit with Pork Cracker & Passion Fruit Sauce ($14++) fared well in terms of moist tender meat, but failed in terms of crackling. I initially expected the belly to be slightly fattier, as the slab we had was rather lean. I want my fat meat!

I was rather taken by the Herb Encrusted Mushroom Escargot ($14++) as the snails were nothing short of plump and juicy.

The Deep Fried Foie Gras, Balsamico Reduction and Cheese Foccacia was somewhat a disappointment. I recently had the Deep Fried Foie Gras at Alkaff Mansion and thought a replication of that would have made my night. However, The Clan’s rendition was off by a mile. My main gripe was that the batter was too thick and drowned out the foie gras. A simple pan-seared one would have sufficed.

4th Course: Soup

I perceive mushroom soups in a negative light. To me, it’s usually something watered down that you get, alongside a drink from a $5 add-on upgrade to a set meal. The Cepes Mushroom with Truffle Paste ($9++) from The Clan however, is far from the cheap mushroom soup you find in such places. It’s chock full of flavour yet not overly thick, retaining a smooth consistency that just warms your whole body as you sip on it. It’s heaven in a bowl, one of the best mushroom soups around surely. I would go back just for this.

Not as awesome as the mushroom soup but nevertheless tasty was the Crab Bisque Cappuccino with Truffle Foam and Prawn Twister ($9++). Very airy and big on flavours to the extent that some of my friends found it too rich and sweet, but it agreed with my palate.

5th Course: Main

T had the 48 Degree Poached Salmon with Japanese Broth, Dehydrated Wakame and Leek Confit ($22++). While the salmon is cooked perfectly in a sous vide style, resulting in a fork tender texture, the flavours are awfully subtle, a huge contrast to the previous dishes that took some getting use to.

I had the Kurobuta Pork Jowl in Pistachio Puree, with Pickled Zucchini and 64 Degree Egg Yolk ($24++), reminding me again of the chef’s history at Dozo where a very similar dish in the form of Kurobuta Pork Cheeks is served. By the way, Jowl is just another word for animal cheeks. The marinade encrusting the pork cheeks added depth to what might have otherwise been a mere savoury dish, and coating the meat with egg yolk balances the flavourfulness of the dish.

Another dish reminiscent to that at Dozo’s is the 48 Hour Beef Short Ribs on Hoba Leef, with Madeira Sauce on Lava Stone ($27++). It’s no surprise that Chef Ken brought this idea over with him, especially since it’s a crowd favourite. The boneless beef ribs are served sizzling atop a hot stone that cooks the beef slowly, leaving the extent of doneness up to the individual to decide. The beef is extremely tender so chewing is kept at a minimal.

6th Course: Dessert

I thought the Madeira Cheese Panna Cotta ($9++) was a pleasant ending to the meal, with the smooth custard topped with a syrup made using madeira, a sweet fortified wine.

One of the more boring dishes I had today was the Chocolate Lava with Raspberry and Homemade Hazelnut Gelato ($9++). Not the best chocolate lava cakes I have come across, but it does its job of satisfying a sweet tooth.

As it was my friend P’s birthday, the staff arranged for a complimentary cheesecake. It tastes alright though it’s rather dry but who’s to complain when it’s free right?

95% of the 75 votes on Hungrygowhere gave The Clan recommend ratings, something almost unheard of and makes one question the authenticity of the votes. However, real votes or not, it’s hard not to love this place. They take care of the small details, like holding 6 different brands of sparkling water and that speaks volumes. In essence, The Clan offers fine dining fusion food that works without burning a hole in the pocket, very much living up to its motto of “classy, lucious and noteworthy”.

The Clan Restaurant

18/20 Bukit Pasoh Road

Tel: +65 6222 2084








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