[London] Orrery – A Falling Star & the difference between Sparkling Wine, Prosecco and Champagne

26 05 2011

Everytime my brother has friends fly over to visit him in London, he never fails to bring them to Orrery, an ex-Michelin star French Restaurant. Similarly during my visit, he made a booking for one of their 3-Course Set Dinners via Toptable, priced at 28.50GBP.

We were first treated to a glass of Grand Cru, a type of French Wine. I’m a noob when it comes to wine and don’t know the difference between prosecco, sparkling wine or champagne. Well, I’m sure many that many of us are in similar predicaments so I shall quickly list out the main differences based on my inference of what all-knowing Google says.

Sparkling Wine is the generic term for all kinds of bubbly. Champagne and Prosecco are all subsets of Sparkling Wine. For Champagne, it must be made from mainly Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes that are grown in the region of Champagne, France while similarly for Prosecco, it must be produced in Prosecco, Italy with the grapes grown there. For simplicity’s sake, all other types of bubbly not produced in these regions will just be simply known as Sparkling Wine (I’m pretty sure there’s some other exceptions and subsets of Sparkling Wine apart from Champagne and Prosecco but those types of bubbly aren’t as well known by the layman). So apart from the region in which it is produced, both Prosecco and Champagne are also fermented using different methods, with Prosecco meant to be consumed young and fresh, taking only 4-6 weeks to produce a bottle while a bottle of Champagne typically takes up to a year on average to produce. Given the exclusivity of Champagne in terms of its production duration and area, it is usually popped only during special occasions while Prosecco is for day to day drinking. I guess this more or less sums up the differences between them. I’m sure this tidbit of information will be useful in helping you impress your friends the next time they ever decide to pop open a bottle of bubbly 😀

According to my brother, Orrery always serves a complimentary starter and pre-dessert. The hors d’oeuvres today was Tomato soup topped with Basil foam which I felt lacked synergy and was too tangy for my liking. Regardless, it was free.

Usually I prefer my foie gras unadulterated, pan-seared and lightly seasoned but a few recent encounters with its terrine/pate versions have left me thinking. Easily the best dish of the night, the Foie Gras Parfait here trumps over the one I had at Novus, with the caramelized apples doing well to contrast against the smooth appetizing parfait.

The Orrery Fish Cake with Tatare Sauce was a simple Fried Salmon Ball. It tastes fine but I was expecting something a little more sophisticated and elegant given the restaurant.

The Salmon Gravadlax with Beetroot & Coriander is something I’d normally avoid due to its simplicity in preparation but then again, it’s also something that hardly ever goes terribly wrong.

For my main, I ordered the Braised Shoulder of Lamb a la Bordelaise with Mashed Potatoes. By the mere fact that I can’t recall much of it ever since eating it last week, I dare say its forgettable, literally.

Given that Orrery specializes in French cuisine, I was quite surprised that a traditional French dish; Confit Duck Facon Grand Mere, Jus Gras, turned out rather soggy.

Even the safest of choices, the Cod Fillet with Potato Cresse & Mussel Veloute was underwhelming and rather petite in size.

The Roasted Sea Bass with Barigoule, Coriander & Citrus was probably the only decent main that evening, with some decent crackling of the fish skin.

For our complimentary pre-dessert, we were each given Rhubarb topped with Lemon Sorbet and Crumble.

For Dessert, most of us sticked to the popular Chocolate Fondant with Blood Orange Sorbet. I tried to capture a pic exhibiting the choc lava flow but given that the molten chocolate was far too little and way too dense, such a feat was impossible. We did enjoy the sorbet though it’s probably the fastest melting sorbet I have seen.

The Apple Crumble with Vanilla Ice Cream too fell short of expectations. Its saving grace was really the Ice Cream with its evident fragrant black specks of vanilla beans.

Complimentary chocolates to end off the meal.

While service and ambience are worthy of Michelin-class, I’m guessing Orrery was probably dropped from the “star-studded” list due to inconsistency in their food.

Bon Appetit!

Orrery

55-57 Marylebone High Street

City of London, London W1U 5RB, United Kingdom

020 7616 8000

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[London] Rhodes W1 – A Modern Take on French

22 05 2011

I was quite pleased with myself when I managed to secure an online booking for lunch at Rhodes W1, especially when it was a 5-Course Spring Tasting Menu at just 25.50GBP. I can’t remember which website I used to make the reservation but I discovered that one of the more dominant reservations sites within the UK would be Toptable. It’s a restaruant booking website (very much like diningcity) which frequently offers diners specially priced set menus, and 50% off restaurant bill deals for diners who choose to make their reservations via toptable for selected restaurants. Why doesn’t Singapore have such a website?!

Awarded 1 Michelin star, Rhodes W1 came across to me as being excessively posh, with a chandelier overhanging each and every table and Molten Brown liquid soap & hand lotion and nicely folded cloth towels in the toilet! (and yes, in case you are wondering, I did what normal kiasu Singaporeans would do and spammed some hand lotion before leaving). Despite being labelled a contemporary French eatery, I believe that much of what Rhodes W1 conjures up derive influences from an eclectic mix of different cuisines.

I’m more of a focaccia person that a ciabatta.

Courgette (Zucchini) Mousse, Goat Cheese Ice Cream with Balsamic Jelly. I liked how the palate cleansing balsamic blended well with the creamy mousse.

Braised Octopus Carpaccio, Chorizo Croquette, Fennel and Lemon. Nothing mind-blowing about the octopus but I did like the Croquette which was well fried though I couldn’t really discern the taste of chorizo from the potato.

As G doesn’t take Octopus, the chef obligingly replaced it with a Pigeon Pate, which ironically I found more tasty and substantial.

I just had a Guinea Fowl Confit at Bistro Du Vinlast week which wasn’t exactly spectacular and concluded that Guinea Fowl is just a lesser poultry, short on taste and texture compared to duck or chicken. However I was proved wrong after tasting the Slowed Cooked Guinea Fowl, Baby Leeks, St George’s Mushrooms & Foie Gras Emulsion today. The cylindrical pieces of meat came from the breast and was stuffed with what I gathered was egg, sunflower seeds and some other ingredients. As for the rectangular piece, it consisted of the thigh portions. Both were succulent and juicy.

Pina Colada. Coconut mousse atop pineapple sorbet.

Carrot Cake Cream Cheese Ice Cream. A sweet ending to the stellar meal.

The bill arrived in an envelope labelled “The Damage”. Very cutesey…I like.

Bon Appetit!

Marble Arch
London W1H 7DL, United Kingdom
Tel: 020 7616 5930





Bistro Du Vin II – 2nd Time’s the Charm

12 05 2011

One of Les Amis’s staff came across my previous lunch post on Bistro Du Vin, and left a comment saying that they would  look into the aspects of the set lunch I felt could be improved upon. This definitely sets the gold standard for customer service; addressing customer’s feedback outside of their restaurant setting. And it is restaurants like this that deserves a revisit should the 1st visit prove unsatisfactory or have fallen short of expectations.

I like the setting of Bistro Du Vin. It exudes a Parisian feel that is uncharacteristic of Singapore. Well-heeled tai tais were scarce today, with the crowd consisting mainly of middle-aged women in their casual tank tops. After all, this isn’t fine dining but traditional french fare, where sharing of foods is to be encouraged rather than frowned upon. As usual, service was attentive and the staff seemed rather happy going about their business.

The complimentary bread came toasty and warm and stood well with me but my bread-discerning friend C commented that the pores of the bread wasn’t large and airy enough. But it’s free bread so 免费多吃!

The 3-Course Set Lunches are priced at $30++, though do expect to pay closer to $40++ if you intend to choose some of the more popular course options.

The Salmon Trout Gravadlax with Dill, Citrus & Radish was just a fancy name for smoked salmon. Not as salty as pre-packed supermarket versions and so, there wasn’t any problems eating it straight up.

French Garlic Sausage & Celeraic Remoulade on Toast. 

Pan-Fried Foie Gras with Prune Compote (supplement of $6). It came as a really large slab, probably the largest I have come across in any set lunch. However, it was throughly drenched in oil, similar in fashion as my previous visit. The problem with the residual oil is that it sticks to the throat which is really irritating. I also felt that the searing could have been executed better. Personally, I think that Ember’s Mirin Foie Gras is the benchmark to beat right now, and rumour has it that Gunther’s Candied Almond Foie Gras ($40) is something to watch out for as well, but at $40 (when Gunther’s set lunch is $38), it’s quite a hard pill to swallow.

Pan-Fried Red Snapper with Lentils Vinaigrette. I have had quite a few bad experiences with Red Snapper as unlike Cod , it’s a pretty lean fish and so, there’s a lot of room for error, especially if the flesh isn’t seasoned well or overcooked. But the Red Snapper here deserves commendation. The fish is fresh and the fish skin is fried to a nice crisp.

Braised Pork Belly with Lingot Bean Stew. I liked the succulent belly pork with its hearty bean and carrot stew. Normally, I would suggest sharing a pot of pork belly but surprisingly, it wasn’t cloying as I had expected it to be and I could have easily polished it off on my own.

French Duck Leg Confit served with Croucroute (supplement of $3, but chef waived it because he deemed the size of the duck leg smaller than usual. A pleasant surprise when the bill came). The duck confit was well done, with the meat left juicy and moist.

Guinea Fowl Confit served with Choucroute. While it looks similar to the duck confit, I much prefer the duck. Guinea Fowl tastes much like chicken, though with a drier and less fatty texture which I find less delectable.

Profiteroles (supplement of $3) are definitely crowd pleasers. I find the ones here adequate, though a notch down from the ones at Au Petit Salut.

The Lemon Meringue Tart was a little too sour for my palate and the tart base could definitely be improved upon.

The Banana Crumble with Coconut Ice Cream is an interesting dessert. The caramelized bananas being a suitable companion to the coconut ice cream.

Creme Brulee was pretty average.

I had a much more enjoyable meal compared to my first visit. Hopefully the 3rd one proves even more so.

Bon Appetit!

BISTRO DU VIN

1 SCOTTS ROAD, #02-12 SHAW CENTRE

TEL: +65 6733 7763





Cocotte – Cuisine Bourgeoise, A French Affair

25 04 2011

The use of interesting wordplay by eateries are becoming ever so prevalent nowadays. From the likes of Thai eatery Porn’s, Joo Chiat’s fine dining restaurant Private Affairs, and now Cocotte. Few people actually know what it means, but Cocotte has 2 meanings attached to it. First, it could mean “a small fireproof dish in which individual portions of food are cooked and served”. Alternatively, it also means “a prostitute or promiscuous woman”, apt wordplay given its location at the Wanderlust Hotel, a boutique hotel off Bugis and Little India.

Cocotte offers rather traditional French fare which I feel embodies the principles of cuisine bourgeoise, a style of french cooking associated with the middle class, as opposed to haute cuisine which places large emphasis on many small courses of elaborate preparations and presentations. Many of the dishes here such as the signature Poulet Roti (Organic Roast Chicken) are simple displays of French country cooking that is meant for communal sharing, and it really allows me to envision the scene of a tight knitted french family eating together and chatting loudly, where the platters of food are being passed around and across the dining table.

French dining is no hurried affair, with meals typically taking up to 2 to 3 hours from what I hear. Sadly, such a dining tradition is gradually being eroded here in Singapore and families are finding it a tall order nowadays just to have short dinners together, often opting to eat out instead of spending quality dining time with family given our busy schedules.

Cocotte offers a variety of set lunches. There’s a 3-Course Set Lunches for 1 pax @ $29++/pax, Set Lunches for 2 pax @ $35++/pax  and Set lunches for 4 pax @ $33++/pax. I would highly recommend going for the set lunches for 2 or 4 pax because they offer more choices with regards to the dishes available and also fits in with Cocotte’s concept of communal dining.

I didn’t like the warm complimentary bread here because it was hard as a stone.

I had no trouble seeing why the Fried Tripe is one of Cocotte’s signature appetizers. Coated with breadcrumbs and served with a tomato salsa, I throughly enjoyed the chewy yet tender texture of the tripe. Although we normally find cow’s stomach in our chinese-styled beef noodles, it’s really quite rare to find it in Singapore served otherwise. I remember eating an unforgettable spicy boiled tripe in Italy (sold at roadside stalls) and I’d imagine that fried tripe would taste awesome in hotdog buns as well!

The Rosette (cured Pork Sausage) was served in a platter with Olives, Salad and Mustard. It’s really not my cup of tea as the sausage and olives were too salty, though I do know that this is how it’s supposed to be.

I much preferred the Tomato & Pickled Anchovy Salad, with the salty anchovies and sweet peaches.

Pan-seared Chicken with Pine Nut, Mushroom & Port Cream, served with crushed Potatoes & Haricot Vert (a type of Green Bean). While the chicken was fabulous on its own, I had some problems with the sauce. It’s probably because of the Port which made the cream base slightly sweet, which I found hard getting used to. The sauce did complement the potatoes though.

Personally, I’d suggest going for the Beef Bourguignon, “Grass fed beef braised in red wine, served with sauteed mushrooms, pearl onions & roasted baby potatoes” as a main. It’s a classic french dish and Cocotte executed it perfectly, scoring higher points than the one I had at Bistro du Vin. If only there was some creamy mash or nice bread to mop up all the gravy.

For desserts, we had a Passionfruit Raspberry Cream Tart, which I found much too tart and overwhelming for my meek tastebuds.

Since it was Easter Weekend, Cocotte also had a special dessert consisting of an Almond Basket Biscuit with Chocolate Truffles & Marshmellows.

The Creme Brulee here is decent and infused with a nice coffee flavour. The custard might have been a tad too dense but still very enjoyable.

A couple of hits and misses but on the whole, the execution of the cooking was very competent. It does justice to traditional French cooking and I definitely wouldn’t mind returning soon to try out more of it’s signatures.

Bon Appetit!

COCOTTE

2 DICKSON ROAD, THE WANDERLUST HOTEL

TEL: +65 6298 1188





Restaurant Ember – The exception to “hara hachi bu”

22 04 2011

I came across the japanese term “hara hachi bu” recently. It’s an Okinawan tradition which means to eat only till 80% full. While it’s a good strategy for avoiding obesity and living a healthy lifestyle, I find it useful and relevant in the art of food appreciation as well. I find that the most memorable meals are the ones where hara hachi bu comes into play, where you leave a restaurant only partially full and left wanting for more. Ever so often are we guilty of attending a buffet and gorging ourselves to get our money’s worth, only to be left unsatisfied and empty at the end of the meal.

However, Restaurant Ember proves to be an exception. Filled to 110% of my bodily capacity, I still found it to be one of my most memorable meals ever.

Despite being situated in what I’d consider to be the most competitive dining environment (the Tanjong Pagar and Outram area) to be found locally, Restaurant Ember still manages to keep up a fully booked reservation list on a day to day basis, which says a lot for an eatery that has already been around for the past 8 years.

At Ember, you can rest assure that there’s no hocus pocus, smoke or pyrotechnics used to impress diners. It’s a place where ambience and service is kept to a respectful minimum, and the the focus is really on the food. I reaffirmed this fact when I received a call confirming my reservation by a staff member who had an uncouth singlish accent, a far cry from the usual dignified “ang mor” accent we are so used to hearing from western eateries.

A warm toasty focaccia kick started our meal.

We were also given a complimentary mocktail each, a promotion for patrons paying with DBS/POSB cards.

3-Course Set Lunches here are priced at $39.50++, though some dish choices (like the foie gras) do require slight additional top-ups.

Pan Seared Foie Gras with Caramelized Apples & Clove, Port & Raspberry Glaze (additional $6 supplement). Me, I’m just a sucker for foie gras. This wasn’t anything out of the ordinary, with the classic light tinge of sour acidity from the malic and ascorbic acid from the apples to help provide some balance for the fatty goose liver. Pity it was slightly overcooked.

Roasted and Poached Foie Gras with Mirin, Shoyu & Shitake (additional $6 supplement). One of my most enjoyable foie gras dishes ever! As opposed to the sweet-sour combi with the previous foie gras dish, this dish was pure savoury goodness.

Marinated Cod with Black Miso, Sweet Peas & Herbed Potatoes. Unlike the previous Miso Cod I had at Greenwood Fish Market, I preferred Ember’s rendition which has a cleaner and lighter taste.

Crispy Duck Leg Confit with new Potatoes, Caramelized Onion & Thyme Jus. Very impressive duck confit they conjured up here, one of the best I have had. The skin is really crisp and somehow devoid of any excess frying oil, the duck meat is moist and supple, and the gravy heavy probably from the duck fat residue but flavourful nonetheless.

Homemade Sticky Date Pudding with Grand Marnier Ice Cream. For the longest time, Sticky Date Pudding has been my favourite dessert but I think I’m starting to tire of it. The Date Pudding here oddly resembles a fruitcake in terms of taste and texture. Personally, I’d prefer it more moist and I think it would have paired better with just a plain old Vanilla Bean Ice Cream instead of the yoghurt tasting Grand Marnier Ice Cream.

Warm Valrhona Chocolate Fondant with Vanilla Bean Ice Cream. I’m sure this would be a hit amongst dark chocolate lovers. The Vanilla Ice Cream is also to die for.

As you can see, Ember just puts a smile on my face. It just might be is my new favourite restaurant. Bon Appetit!

RESTAURANT EMBER

50 KEONG SAIK ROAD, HOTEL 1929

TEL: +65 6347 1928





Oyster Bar – No Pearls in this Oyster

23 03 2011

Day 1 of Restaurant Week. It should have been awesome, with the supposed incentive of dining more cheaply at selected restaurants offering a prix fixe menu. Yet, our luncheon at Oyster Bar proved to be awfully disappointing.

Oyster Bar is a “European fine-dining Seafood Bar” or so they claim. While I do not discount its status as a European Seafood Bar, I found the service and food to have fallen short of fine-dining standards. Overlooking Marina Bay Sands, I guess it caters more as a bar than a restaurant for the post-dinner crowd, where I believe the night ambience would be a whole lot more romantic.

Weekday set lunches here normally costs $44++, which is way overpriced if you ask me given what’s available on the set menu. For Restaurant Week, a 3-Course set lunch is priced at a slight discount at $40++.

We started off our meal with a Pair of Freshly Shucked Oysters each, paired with a homemade Champagne Vinaigrette with fresh raspberries. No doubt the oysters were fresh but it was much too briny for me because I love to be able to taste the subtle sweetness of fresh oysters without my tongue shriveling up like a snail exposed to salt. Anyway, for affordable oysters, I’d still have to give my vote to Greenwood Fish Market where freshly shucked oysters go at $1 a pop on Tuesdays (with any main course ordered).

For mains, the Baked Snapper Fillet was appalling. Not sure if they were trying to infuse a Mediterranean style but it failed, not to mention the snapper was way overcooked.

The Slowed-cooked Duck Thigh nestled on Truffled Mash Potatoes & Orange Confit accompanied by Brie Baked Oysters fared slightly better, but I would still consider it below par, given the few other Confit de Canards I have tried in Singapore. My main grouse was that it was rather soggy (hence not crisp) and extremely salty, though eating it with mash did help to tone down the saltiness…somewhat. As for the Brie baked oysters, I would say that the there wasn’t much symphony, with the flavours of brie and oyster each wanting to stand out on its own.

For desserts, the Lemon Tart whilst generous in portion, was cringingly sour and the pastry lacked butteriness and flakiness.

Likewise, the Raspberry Creme Brulee didn’t pass muster. The consistency was far too dense and eggy instead of light and airy.

Food wasn’t the only concern today. Despite having only 4 other customers who I saw in the entire restaurant, my glass was left unfilled for the longest time. Furthermore I found the high bar chairs of Oyster Bar to be rather uncomfortable for a meal.

Bon Appetit!

OYSTER BAR

70 COLLYER QUAY, #01-01 CUSTOMS HOUSE

TEL: +65 6534 5534





Novus Restaurant, Bar, Cafe & Courtyard – Service Faux Pas

22 02 2011

In contemplating what constitutes an affordable set lunch, Novus (with its $28/$38++ 2/3 Course Set Lunch) would definitely not be one of the few places that comes to mind, especially when more established players such as Gunthers, The French Kitchen and Au Petit Salut charge at similar if not cheaper rates. Yet, located just opposite SMU, it was one of the few restaurants I could afford to dine at without being (too) late for my next appointment…a project meeting during recess week sighs.

Window view from inside Novus. Nice clouds 🙂

With a cuisine that borders on the contemporary, would Novus prove itself to be an avant-garde in French cuisine or simply all sizzle and no steak?

Located within Singapore Museum, Novus is separated into 2 dining segments; the Restaurant & Bar for fine dining and the Cafe & Courtyard for casual dining. I was initially led into the cafe when I asked one of the waiters if that was Novus but quickly realised the mistake upon seeing a menu consisting mainly of sandwiches and pastas.

While the Cafe & Courtyard had an open concept with the optimal use of natural sun as lighting, the Restaurant & Bar had a more private feel to it. After settling down inside the restaurant, my friend Raina and I were only given the set lunch menu after probing the staff, who had previously provided us with simply the ala carte menu. When passing us the menus, somehow the waiter had a nonchalant and unapologetic look that severely irritated me, and it didn’t help that service remained crappy throughout the meal as I will describe in vivid detail later.

Raina and I had the 3-Course Set Lunch at $38++. I thought that the selection of mains available was pretty decent, ranging from angus beef cheeks, duck confit, snow cod and trio of berkshire pork belly, pork cheek & pata negra ham just to name a few.

We were first served a basket of complimentary bread which I found so-so.

For our complimentary amuse bouche, we were served Heart of Palm with Grape in a Vinaigrette dressing. A bit too acidic for me since I hadn’t had my breakfast then.

For appetizer, the Foie Gras Lassi V2.0 was a combination of goose liver parfait and yoghurt. Something interesting about Novus is that it provides a small information card along with the courses as they are served (very much aligned with the museum theme which has information stands for each exhibit) and it went as such: “The goose liver is marinated with port wine, Sherry, Madeira and Brandy. It is then combined with shallots, thyme, butter and eggs and slow poached to create a goose liver parfait”. While the combination was good, I would have preferred if there was a greater accentuation of the foie gras, as the lassi overwhelmed it somewhat.

When I saw the Norwegian Salmon treated like a Salad, it totally reminded me of the Tuna Carpaccio Salad I had at The Lighthouse @ Fullerton Hotel just a few months back, think it’s because the same black serving platter is used. For this dish, the Salmon was cooked sous vide, meaning it was cooked under low temperatures over an extended period in a vacuum, thus allowing the salmon proteins to remain intact and keeping the fish tender. As such, the Salmon tasted much like sashimi which I found very gratifying.

For Mains, I would highly recommend the Hickory Smoked Black Angus Beef Cheek. The beef cheeks were tender as butter and went amazing well with the mushroom creme. The portion was also rather generous. My only grouse is that it wasn’t served warm enough. The Triple Cooked French Fries that came along with it was really tasty as well.

As for the Crisp Duck Leg Confit, the portion was rather miserable though it could be due to the fact that it was deboned and hence looked unsubstantial. The duck meat was moist and tender, better than most of the duck confits I have come across for this aspect though this came at the expense of a skin that was not as crisp.

For Desserts, the Fruit Jelly sounded novel with the description “Assorted Berries & Fruits in Champagne Jelly & Elderflower Sorbet”. Unfortunately, it was really unpalatable and I gave up after 3 small spoonfuls. The jelly was really sour with an aftertaste of wine gone bad and the Elderflower Sorbet was exceedingly too sweet for one to bear.

Chocolate Test had the description “50% souffle, 68% Mousse, 80% Sorbet”. No idea what that meant, perhaps that’s the optimal proportion in which we are to eat them together for each mouthful? Unlike the fruit jelly, this was really outstanding. I dare say it’s even more enjoyable than the chocolate souffle at Laurent Bernard’s Chocolatier, which is the benchmark to beat in my opinion.

While the food was a mix of hits and misses, I’d like to reiterate on the dismal service standards here as mentioned earlier. First, menus not distributed properly. Second, waiter didn’t bother to write down our orders and had to come back amidst the meal to reconfirm our dessert orders. Third, request for warm water was ignored and cold water was served instead which we quickly corrected. Fourth, friend’s cup remained empty for a really long duration. Fifth, diners (not exclusive to ourselves) were left unattended with no staff in sight over quite a few occasions and during the few times where staff were present, they often missed out our desperate cries for attention. Sixth, my query on what sauce was used for the Salmon Salad was dismissed quickly with a “Basil” which was definitely erroneous as it sure didn’t taste like it. Seventh, the waiter stood by using eye power instead of pulling out the chair for my dining partner or me, and not offering an extra chair to put our bags (I was lugging 2 bags and a laptop). Not that I’m being a snob or fussy pot (much), but there’s just a basic level of service you’d expect to be accorded with when dining at a “fine dining” venue which was evidently lacking here today.

Ok, just to add some balance to my critical comments, a plus point for service is that Novus gave out a free muffin each to every diner, in a nice box with a Thank You note inside. Ate the muffin for supper at home, it’s not too bad with a pleasant fruit-cakey taste.

On hindsight, food was ok. I definitely wouldn’t mind paying $28++ for a 2 course if I could leave out the fruit jelly.

Bon Appetit!

NOVUS RESTAURANT, BAR, CAFE & COURTYARD

93 STAMFORD ROAD, #01-02 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SINGAPORE

TEL: +65 6336 8770








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